IT Lab: THE JEANETTE AND LOUIS BROOKS COMPUTER CENTER

THE JEANETTE AND LOUIS BROOKS COMPUTER CENTER 
41 Cooper Square, 8th Floor, Room 101| 816 | 802 | 803
Fall 2020 Hours: M-F, 9am-10pm; Sat, 8am-6pm; Sun, 12pm-8pm
Phone Number: 212-353-4350 or x350 on campus

Click here to connect with a member of our Academic Support team (M-F 9am-5pm).

The Brooks Computer Center is open to students, faculty, and staff from all three schools.  The lab houses both Dell and Apple iMac desktop computers that are installed with the latest software for video, animation, 3d design and simulations. The Brooks Computer Center is managed by Wayne Adams, who is joined by a team of dedicated student workers.  Student workers in the Brooks Computer Center provide a first line of IT helpdesk support for all students, faculty and staff in all three schools.

During Fall 2020, in accordance with COVID-19 safety protocols, rooms 802, 803 & 816 will be closed to students, staff & faculty. 41CS Room 101 is open during building hours for computing and printing Monday - Friday 9am - 10pm. Student workers will be available for remote support during this time.

Click here to book time with a workstation in 41CS 101 (bookings are available in 2 hour increments).

Click here to chat with an available Student Worker.

Equipment Available
    •    HP Enterprise m750 color laser printer

    •    HP Enterprise m750 b/w laser printer (2)
 
    •    Epson 10000 Professional Scanners (2)

 

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.